O Come, O Come, Emmanuel Lyrics Graphic Template

O Come, O Come, Emmanuel - Lyrics

Latin (9th Century)
Translated by
John Mason Neale (1818-1866)

O come, o come, Emmanuel,
And ransom captive Israel,
That mourns in lonely exile here
Until the Son of God appear.

Refrain: Rejoice! Rejoice!
Emmanuel shall come to thee, o Israel.

O come, thou wisdom from on high;
Who orderest all things mightily;
To us the path of knowledge show,
And teach us in her ways to go.

Refrain: Rejoice! Rejoice!
Emmanuel shall come to thee, o Israel.

O come, thou rod of Jesse, free
Thine own from satan’s tyranny;
From depths of hell thy people save,
And give them victory over the grave

Refrain: Rejoice! Rejoice!
Emmanuel shall come to thee, o Israel.

O come, thou day-spring, come and cheer
Our spirits by thine advent here;
Disperse the gloomy clouds of night,
And death’s dark shadows put to flight.

Refrain: Rejoice! Rejoice!
Emmanuel shall come to thee, o Israel.

O come, thou key of David, come,
And open wide our heavenly home;
Make safe the way that leads on high,
And close the path to misery.

Refrain: Rejoice! Rejoice!
Emmanuel shall come to thee, o Israel.

O come, o come, great lord of might,
Who to thy tribes on Sinai’s height
In ancient times once gave the law
In cloud and majesty and awe.

Refrain: Rejoice! Rejoice!
Emmanuel shall come to thee, o Israel.

O come, thou root of Jesse’s tree,
An ensign of thy people be.
Before thee rulers silent fall;
All peoples on thy mercy call.

Refrain: Rejoice! Rejoice!
Emmanuel shall come to thee, o Israel.

O come, desire of nations, bind
In one the hearts of all mankind;
Bid thou our sad divisions cease,
And be Thyself our king of peace.

Refrain: Rejoice! Rejoice!
Emmanuel shall come to thee, o Israel.

Notes on the Lyrics

Latin Antiphons

“O Come, O Come Emmanuel” is a compilation of Latin antiphons—verses spoken or sung around passages of scripture. By the twelfth century, antiphons became standardized as a response to the song of Mary—the “Magnificat” from Luke’s gospel.

Arranged into a Hymn

These antiphons were first arranged into a hymn published in the German city of Cologne in 1710. Subsequently, this hymn was translated into English by John Mason Neale in 1851. Ten years later it was altered for inclusion in the London, first edition of “Hymns Ancient and Modern.”

Increased Awareness of the Season of Advent

“O Come, O Come Emmanuel” has now achieved world-wide popularity. Most significantly, it has brought increased awareness of the season of Advent as a preparation for Christmas.

About the Author Larry Frazier

Larry spent 24 years teaching music at the University of West Georgia to over 6,000 students. Ten years ago, Larry and his wife Mary Lynn, received comfort, support and inspiration from traditional Christian hymns while she overcame stage-three colon cancer. Larry is on a mission to help you discover God’s incredible power through the intersection of faith and Christian music in your life.